education's digital future

in the news

It’s nearly impossible to get into MIT, very expensive to enroll there, and exceedingly hard to graduate, which are some of the reasons why MIT degrees are so coveted. But very soon you’ll be able to take a series of online courses in computer science and earn an official certificate from one of the most prestigious engineering schools in the world, all for only a few hundred dollars—and without having to meet any admissions requirements. MIT will be launching these XSeries Certificate programs in the next few months, including one in “supply chain management.”

WASHINGTON -- Advocates for students with disabilities and groups representing colleges and universities are sparring over federal legislation that would set new standards for accessible technology on campuses.

In new report, Stanford GSE researchers identify secrets to successful technology implementation, particularly with students at risk of dropping out.

EdX, the online-education initiative run by Harvard and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, is expanding its curriculum with 26 new classes aimed at high-school students who are hoping to master some advanced-placement subjects before heading off to college.

The providers of massive open online courses mostly cater to adults who already went to college. Now one provider, edX, is setting its sights on high-school students who are trying to get in.

The nonprofit organization just announced a raft of free, online courses for high-school students. Most of the new MOOCs cover material from Advanced Placement courses in traditional disciplines. But one course, called “The Road to Selective College Admissions,” will aim to counsel students on how to produce a successful college application.

This month's edition of The Pulse podcast looks at what the future holds for efforts to use technology to "flip" the classroom.

The podcast is the second of a two-part series on the 2014 Horizon Report. In the first part, Rodney B. Murray, the host of The Pulse, discussed the trends in eLearning pedagogy.

The Pulse is Inside Higher Ed's monthly technology podcast, produced by Murray, executive director of the office of academic technology at University of the Sciences....

STANFORD, Calif., Sept. 3, 2014 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- Two world-renowned schools - the Stanford School of Medicine and the Stanford School of Engineering – have joined forces to create their first online professional certificate program. The Stanford Genetics and Genomics Certificate combines Stanford's expertise in medicine, technology and online learning to offer a world class education in genetics and genomics online. Courses are taught by faculty from Stanford's Department of Genetics, a world leader in the fields of genetics, genomics and personalized medicine.

Vaibhav Verma was frustrated that he could not get into the most popular courses at Rutgers University, so he decided to try a new approach.

He didn’t sleep outside classrooms to be first in line when the door opened, or send professors a solicitous note. Instead, he built a web-based application that could repeatedly query the New Jersey university’s registration system. As soon as anyone dropped the class, Mr. Verma’s tool would send him a message, and he would grab the open spot.

“I built it just because I was a little bit bored,” he said.

John G. Sperling, a pioneer of for-profit education who turned a $26,000 investment into the multibillion-dollar University of Phoenix, calling himself “an unintentional entrepreneur and an accidental C.E.O.,” died on Friday in the San Francisco area. He was 93.

His death was announced by the Apollo Education Group, the university’s parent company, which gave no other details.

John R. Barker paces the front of the lecture hall, gesturing at slides with a laser pointer and explaining to a room full of undergraduates how scientists use data to make predictions about global climate change.

At the moment Mr. Barker, a professor of atmospheric science at the University of Michigan, is facing a climate crisis of his own: The atmosphere in this lecture hall is dead.

Pages